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Re: A summary of MACT ZZZZ

http://www.regulations.gov/search/Regs/home.html#home

 

 

You can research regulations here as well...its a decent site.

Regular Contributor

Re: A summary of MACT ZZZZ

That's out of the goodness in my heart! If you feel compelled to donate, I'll send you a link to my paypal!!!!!!!

Todd

Regular Contributor

A summary of MACT ZZZZ

1

 Summary of Requirements for the February 17, 2010 Final Rule for National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines [75 FR 9648]

On February 17, 2010, EPA published its final rule for existing stationary compression ignition (CI) reciprocating internal combustion engines under 40 CFR 63 Subpart ZZZZ (MACT ZZZZ). The final rule does not include regulations for existing spark ignition engines. The regulations for existing spark ignition engines will be promulgated by August 10, 2010.

Applicability

The February 17, 2010 Final Rule applies to the following sources:

                        Existing stationary CI engines at area sources of HAPs

                        Existing stationary CI engines less than or equal to 500 hp at major sources of HAPs

                        Existing non‐emergency stationary CI engines greater than 500 hp at major sources of HAPs

                        Startup, shutdown, and malfunction for engines previously regulated under MACT ZZZZ

 

A stationary RICE is existing if construction or reconstruction commenced before the following dates:

                        December 19, 2002 for engines greater than 500 hp at a major source of HAPs

                        June 12, 2006 for engines less than or equal to 500 hp at a major source of HAPs

                        June 12, 2006 for engines located at area sources of HAPs

 

A change in ownership of an existing stationary RICE does not make that engine a new or reconstructed RICE.

Sources previously regulated under MACT ZZZZ include:

                        Existing, new, and reconstructed stationary RICE greater than 500 hp located at major sources of HAPs (June 15, 2004)

                        New and reconstructed stationary RICE located at area sources of HAPs (January 18, 2008)

                        New and reconstructed stationary RICE less than or equal to 500 hp located at major sources of HAPs (January 18, 2008)

 

A major source of HAP emissions has the potential to emit 10 tons per year or more of any single HAP and 25 tons per year or more of all HAPs combined. An area source of HAP emissions is a source that is not a major source.

The final rule is not applicable to existing stationary emergency engines located at area sources that are at residential, commercial or institutional facilities.

Dual‐fuel engines in which a liquid fuel (typically diesel fuel) is used for CI and gaseous fuel (typically natural gas) is used as the primary fuel at an annual average ratio of less than 2 parts diesel fuel to 100 2

parts total fuel on an energy equivalent basis are spark ignition engines. If the ratio of diesel fuel to total fuel is higher, then the engine is regulated as a CI engine.

Compliance Date

The effective date of this final rule is May 3, 2010. Compliance with the emission limitations and operating limitations for existing CI RICE is required within 3 years from the effective date of this final rule, or May 3, 2013.

Initial Notifications

An initial notification is required for non‐emergency existing CI engines greater than 100 hp subject to numerical emission standards. For engines with an initial startup date before the effective date of the rule, an initial notification must be submitted within 120 days of the effective date of the final rule, or by August 31, 2010.

Emissions Standards and Work Practice Standards

Emission standards and work practice standards are listed for each engine category in Table 1. The numerical emission standards in the final rule for CI RICE do not apply during periods of startup.

Numerical emission standards for non‐emergency CI engines less than 100 hp at major sources and for emergency CI engines in the proposed rule were replaced with work practice standards in the final rule. The numerical emission standards in the proposed rule were revised in the final rule based on additional information submitted to EPA during the comment period.

Engines subject to work practice standards must keep records of oil and filter change dates and the corresponding hour on the hour meter, inspection and replacement dates for air cleaners, hoses and belts, and records of other emission‐related repairs and maintenance performed.

Initial Performance Test

An initial performance test is required to demonstrate compliance with numerical emission standards for existing CI engines greater than 100 hp at a major source or greater than 300 hp at an area source.

The initial performance test must be conducted within 180 days of the compliance date for the engine, or by October 30, 2013. If an initial performance test was previously conducted, the engine does not have to be retested if the following conditions are met: the same test methods specified in Subpart ZZZZ were used, the test is not older than 2 years, the test is reviewed and accepted by the Administrator, and no process or equipment changes have been made since the test was performed.

A notification of performance test and a test plan, if requested, must be submitted 60 days prior to the scheduled test date. 3

A Notification of Compliance Status must be sent within 60 days following completion of the initial performance test, or 30 days after completion of performance evaluation of a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS).

Crankcase Emissions Control

Existing, stationary, non‐emergency CI engines greater than 300 hp are required to control crankcase emissions to reduce metallic HAP emissions. If the engine is not already equipped with a closed crankcase ventilation system, then either a closed crankcase ventilation system or an open crankcase filtration emission control system must be installed. A closed crankcase ventilation system must prevent crankcase emissions from being emitted to the atmosphere. An open crankcase filtration system must reduce emissions from the crankcase by filtering the exhaust stream to remove oil mist, particulates, and metals. Manufacturer’s requirements must be followed for operating and maintaining either type of system and for replacing the crankcase filters.

Records must be kept of the manufacturer’s recommended maintenance procedures and of maintenance performed on the system.

Oil Analysis Program

A new option for engines subject to the work practices requirements is using the oil analysis program to extend the specified oil change frequencies. The oil analysis must be performed at the same frequency as required by the work practice standard. The following three parameters must be analyzed: total base number, viscosity, and percent water content. If the total base number is less than 30 percent of the total base number of the oil when new; the viscosity of the oil has changed by more than 20 percent from the viscosity when new; or the percent water content by volume is greater than 0.5, then the oil must be changed. If none of these parameters have been exceeded then an oil change is not required. Records must be kept of the parameters that are analyzed as part of this program.

Startup Requirements

Numerical emission standards during startup, shutdown and malfunction in the proposed rule were replaced with operational standards during engine startup. Emission standards during normal operation continue to apply during shutdown and malfunction.

Engine startup is defined as the time from initial start until applied load and engine and associated equipment, including the catalyst if applicable, reach steady state or normal operation. Owners and operators must minimize the engine’s time spent at idle and minimize the engine’s startup time to a period needed for appropriate and safe loading of the engine, not exceed 30 minutes, after which time the non‐startup emission limitations apply. 4

Operating Limitations

Engines that are equipped with oxidation catalyst must maintain the catalyst so that the pressure drop across the catalyst does not change by more than 2 inches of water from the pressure drop that was measure during the initial performance test. The catalyst inlet temperature must be maintained between 450 and 1350 F.

Fuel Requirements

Existing, stationary, non‐emergency CI engines greater than 300 hp with a displacement of less than 30 liters per cylinder located at major sources that use diesel fuel must meet the nonroad diesel fuel requirements of 40 CFR 80.510(b), which limits sulfur content to 15 ppm and either a minimum cetane index of 40 or a maximum aromatic content of 35 volume percent.

Emergency Engines

Unless the existing emergency engine meets the requirements for non‐emergency engines, a non‐resettable hour meter must be installed to record hours of operation. Maintenance and testing is limited to 100 hours per year. There is no time limit on use during emergencies. Records must be kept of hours of operation and why the engine was operated.

Non‐emergency use is allowed for up to 50 hours per year, but those 50 hours are counted towards the 100 hours for maintenance and testing. The 50 hours per year may not be used for peak shaving or to generate income for the facility as part of a financial arrangement.

The emergency engine may be operated for up to 15 hours per year as part of an emergency demand response program if the regional transmission organization and transmission operator has determined there are emergency conditions that could lead to a potential electrical blackout. The engine may not be operated for more than 30 minutes prior to the time when the emergency condition is expected to occur and operation must be terminated immediately after the facility is notified that the emergency condition is no longer imminent.

Reporting Requirements

Semiannual and annual compliance reports are required after the compliance date for the engine. Compliance reports must include information on startup, shutdown and malfunctions, and any deviations from emission standards or operating limitations. If the facility has a title V permit, compliance reports should be submitted according to the schedule in the permit.

Trusted Contributor

Re: The new EPA Rule will cost you!!!!

Referred to as RICE NESHAP, but the code of federal regulations is:

 

40 CFR 63

 

Which in detail (over 200 pages worth) defines the regulations and areas they are affecting.  

 

Be sure to check with your LOCAL STATE agency to see if and how they will be enforcing such rules.  States may enact more strict regulations on the rules if they so choose do so.  

 

New member

Re: The new EPA Rule will cost you!!!!

Can somone help me out with a link to a site where I can find these regulations?

Contributor

Re: The new EPA Rule will cost you!!!!

The rule for the closed crankcase ventilation will apply to CI greater than 300 hp.

 

In addidtion there will be mandates that will require owner/operators to keep records that show that management practices that are required are being met. These records must include, at a minimum:  Oil and filter change dates and corresponding hour on the hour meter; inspection and replacement dates for air cleaners, hoses, and belts; and records of other emission-related repairs and maintenance performed.

 

 

Darrel Fischer
Field Service Technician
Natural Gas Compression and Production
Regular Contributor

The new EPA Rule will cost you!!!!

EPA published the final MACT rule for CI engines in the Federal Register this week.  The effective date of the rule is May 3, 2010. An initial notification must be submitted within 120 days of the effective date (August 31, 2010) for existing CI engines that are greater than 100 hp and subject to numerical emission standards. The compliance date is May 3, 2013. An initial performance test is required within 180 days of the compliance date (October 30, 2013) for existing CI engines greater than 100 hp at a major source of HAPs or greater than 300 hp at an area source of HAPs. This thing is going to hurt! The majority of non-emergency stationary RICE will require a catalyst  on the exhaust side and if you vent your crankcase  you  must either filter before venting or return it back to the crankcase.