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Re: 3512 DITA Genset

Specific Alignment Considerations As mentioned in the Alignment section introduction, Caterpillar provides Special Instructions with specific alignment procedures for all Cat engine and driven equipment combinations. These procedures are listed at the end of this section under Reference Material and should be used for the actual alignment procedure, but the following offers some specific considerations relating to some of the more common applications. Alignment of Close-Coupled Driven Equipment Close-coupled components, such as single-bearing generators, transmissions, compounds, etc., rely on bolting together of two piloted housings to determine alignment. When two piloted housings are joined together in a parallel manner, they are in alignment. However, outside stresses can be introduced by poor mounting practices and allow the flywheel housing to flex. This can contribute to high vibration. To check for outside stresses, loosen the mounting bolts between the driven equipment and engine flywheel housing. There should be no contact between flywheel housing and driven equipment housing at this time to assure that neither housing is being stressed. Clearance between the two separated faces should be parallel within 0.13 mm (0.005 in). Refer to Figure 19. Oil field generators are extra heavy and may distort the

Specific Alignment Considerations As mentioned in the Alignment section introduction, Caterpillar provides Special Instructions with specific alignment procedures for all Cat engine and driven equipment combinations. These procedures are listed at the end of this section under Reference Material and should be used for the actual alignment procedure, but the following offers some specific considerations relating to some of the more common applications. Alignment of Close-Coupled Driven Equipment Close-coupled components, such as single-bearing generators, transmissions, compounds, etc., rely on bolting together of two piloted housings to determine alignment. When two piloted housings are joined together in a parallel manner, they are in alignment. However, outside stresses can be introduced by poor mounting practices and allow the flywheel housing to flex. This can contribute to high vibration. To check for outside stresses, loosen the mounting bolts between the driven equipment and engine flywheel housing. There should be no contact between flywheel housing and driven equipment housing at this time to assure that neither housing is being stressed. Clearance between the two separated faces should be parallel within 0.13 mm (0.005 in). Refer to Figure 19. Oil field generators are extra heavy and may distort the.

bolted to the flywheel housing. Such practices stress both the generator housing and flywheel housing and can cause vibrations. It is not necessary to make this check on smaller Cat generator sets where the engine does not have rear mounting feet but relies on the generator set support. However, this check is necessary on smaller Cat engines where the driven equipment is also rigidly connected to another piece of equipment. A common example of this would be a mechanical drive where the clutch mechanism is bolted to the compound. Poor mounting practices with this arrangement can cause excessive stresses in the flywheel housing. Single bearing generators are recommended to have a pilot shaft extension and loose fitting flex plates, or no pilot shaft extension with piloted plates. This aids in maintaining proper alignment. If vibration is noted at assembly of a generator having coupling plates piloted into the flywheel, repositioning the coupling plates ¼- of-a-turn with respect to the original location can often correct the vibration. Start the unit and observe the change in vibration. A second or third relocation may be necessary to find the position of lowest vibration. Locate plates at point of lowest vibration. This procedure allows manufacturing tolerances to attempt to cancel each other.

Before bolting coupling plates onto the flywheel, always rotate engine to the same position. For example, cylinder number 1 TDC. Tighten half the bolts while the flywheel is in this position. Then rotate as necessary to tighten other bolts. This procedure assures that any sag in the crankshaft is always at the same position when the plates are fastened to the flywheel.

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Re: 3512 DITA Genset

Can not view the document, you could send me the document by email, I appreciate your help.

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Re: 3512 DITA Genset

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3512 DITA Genset

Need help to know if the electric generator is auto-alignable to the combustion engine in this model