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Contributor

Re: Leaking

Hi Fabio

 

If you have two engine's you can change load sharing if they run Parrellel give one engine from time to time more load thane the other if you dont have load bank.

 

or

 

See MIKE L

 

text. Copie

 

Slobber is a common problem in engines that are operated for extended periods of "light load".  It is composed of fuel and lube oil residues mixed with water condensed from combustion, it has a solvency effect and will tend to wash off accumulated carbon deposits from surfaces and transport them to leak points.

 

It can be found on virtually any engine, newer design engines with keystone ring packs are more prone to slobber problems due to low cylinder sealing pressures at low loads.  Older design engines with rectangular ring packs are less prone to slobber, but can still have the issue.

 

The definition of "light load" is what gets a bit tricky in determining how badly your particular engine will slobber.  In general as engines are redesigned to meet newer emissions regulations, they will be more prone to slobber. 

 

Many of the newer CAT engines provide optimum ring seal and complete combustion above 50-60% of rated load (the same with most competative engines as well).

 

Negative effects of slobber include,

 

Deposit buildup in manifolds, reducing exhaust flow, increasing cylinder temperatures, affecting engine performance

Deposit buildup in cylinders, affects combustion performance, increases emissions and fuel consumption

Soot buildup reduces lube oil life

Deposit buildup on turbo exhaust wheels cause turbo's to turn slower, produce less boost, affect performance, can also imbalance turbo and cause failure.

Deposits buildup in exhaust piping and muffler, in extreme cases can lead to exhaust fires that are virtually impossible to put out

 

General rule of thumb to reduce slobber, for every eight hours running engine below 45% load, run engine at least one hour above 75% load.  If you do weekly no load runs, try to do a loaded run above 50% at least once a quarter.  Do a full load test at least once a year for four hours.  Your engine may be more or less tolerent and the actual run times modified to meet the real nee.  In general, run an engine for at least one hour after the exhaust clears and the unit reaches normal jacket and lube oil temperatures.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Mike L.

New member

Re: Leaking

I just bought a week ago a D16E3S for home and use it for almost 35 hours.  This is what you're referring? What I should do, it's new.  

IMG_7285.JPG

Contributor

Re: Leaking


moe wrote:

I do not understand distributor, do you mean exhaust manifold?      we are having ice days here in Atlanta so I am bored.      the term we use here is wet stacking.      it is diesel fuel [unburnt] that combines with carbon in the exhaust manifold to produce ugly black **bleep** running down the side of the engine.     on a b model 3512 I would suggest a tune up, valves [intake and exhaust], injector racks specifically if they are on a b model, [i cannot remember].       you also need to run with at least 30% load.     to clear it up, clean up the oil leaks, then run a 2 hour load bank at minimum of 75% load, then exercise with a minimum load of at least 30% load.    sincerely mike moeller


i am not a cat tech, not all that familiar with the cat model line or engines offered..  could he be referring to a leak coming from the distributor on a natural gas engine, the altronic perhaps? he mentions fuel/oil mix.. so it could a diesel. also, wet stacking and slobber are two seperate issues. slobber is leaks coming from seals, gaskets and other sealing points. wet stacking is like you said.. unburnt fuel building up in the exhaust. both problems are solved by running the engine under load.. i would recommend having a built in load bank installed into the standby generator system. exercising the generator weekly under load is acceptable, but the loads must be sufficient. built-in load banks are convenient because you can control the loads on the engine to make sure it's sufficient. most important thing to remember is that engines want to be run under load as often as possible.

Cat Dealer
Dealer

Re: Leaking

I do not understand distributor, do you mean exhaust manifold?      we are having ice days here in Atlanta so I am bored.      the term we use here is wet stacking.      it is diesel fuel [unburnt] that combines with carbon in the exhaust manifold to produce ugly black **bleep** running down the side of the engine.     on a b model 3512 I would suggest a tune up, valves [intake and exhaust], injector racks specifically if they are on a b model, [i cannot remember].       you also need to run with at least 30% load.     to clear it up, clean up the oil leaks, then run a 2 hour load bank at minimum of 75% load, then exercise with a minimum load of at least 30% load.    sincerely mike moeller

Contributor

Re: Leaking

Agread with makil coments

NAZIR

Visitor

Re: Leaking

yes it is possible

 

Contributor

Re: Leaking

We run run lots of engines at our site with very small loads. There are two solutions to this slobbering problem. Solution 1-Get a smaller engine. Solution 2-Run a load bank on the engine and set it up to keep the load where ever you like. With the flip of a switch the load can be anything you want. Ours is portable and easy to move around. If anyone is interested, I can post a picture of our portable unit. Definitely cheaper than a failed engine.

Highlighted
Super Contributor

Re: Leaking

Slobber is a common problem in engines that are operated for extended periods of "light load".  It is composed of fuel and lube oil residues mixed with water condensed from combustion, it has a solvency effect and will tend to wash off accumulated carbon deposits from surfaces and transport them to leak points.

 

It can be found on virtually any engine, newer design engines with keystone ring packs are more prone to slobber problems due to low cylinder sealing pressures at low loads.  Older design engines with rectangular ring packs are less prone to slobber, but can still have the issue.

 

The definition of "light load" is what gets a bit tricky in determining how badly your particular engine will slobber.  In general as engines are redesigned to meet newer emissions regulations, they will be more prone to slobber. 

 

Many of the newer CAT engines provide optimum ring seal and complete combustion above 50-60% of rated load (the same with most competative engines as well).

 

Negative effects of slobber include,

 

Deposit buildup in manifolds, reducing exhaust flow, increasing cylinder temperatures, affecting engine performance

Deposit buildup in cylinders, affects combustion performance, increases emissions and fuel consumption

Soot buildup reduces lube oil life

Deposit buildup on turbo exhaust wheels cause turbo's to turn slower, produce less boost, affect performance, can also imbalance turbo and cause failure.

Deposits buildup in exhaust piping and muffler, in extreme cases can lead to exhaust fires that are virtually impossible to put out

 

General rule of thumb to reduce slobber, for every eight hours running engine below 45% load, run engine at least one hour above 75% load.  If you do weekly no load runs, try to do a loaded run above 50% at least once a quarter.  Do a full load test at least once a year for four hours.  Your engine may be more or less tolerent and the actual run times modified to meet the real nee.  In general, run an engine for at least one hour after the exhaust clears and the unit reaches normal jacket and lube oil temperatures.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Mike L.

New member

Re: Leaking

No doubt that is oil.The correct technical name is slobbering. This would happen only because of low load. since 3516 ..you have to load atleast 60% load. otherwise it would lead you to premature failures of components

Trusted Contributor

Re: Leaking

Certain D3516 product have a "slobber" issue at low load issues.  It causes a black oil/fuel/soot residue to leak from the manifold assemblies.  I believe there was a publication that acknowledged this but not sure if there was a definite fix.  I would advise consulting your CAT dealer with your serial number and have them provide you with the publication.